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June 05, 2014

From Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund:New York State Updates Birth Certificate Policy

June 5, 2014

Great News! New York State Updates Birth Certificate Policy; TLDEF Calls upon NYC to Follow Suit

Transgender People Born in New York State Can Now Readily Obtain a Birth Certificate That Matches Who They Are, But Obstacles Remain for Those Born in NYC

We are thrilled to report that the State of New York has eliminated barriers to accurate ID by updating its policy on correcting birth certificates for transgender people. The state will now issue a corrected birth certificate after receiving an affidavit from a licensed medical provider stating that a transgender individual has received appropriate clinical treatment.

The previous policy, which had not been updated since the 1970’s, required proof of surgery. This left the vast majority of transgender New Yorkers – who have not undergone the extensive surgical procedures that were demanded by the state before it would change the sex designation on birth certificates – with a document that does not match who they are. The state deemed this outmoded requirement to be inconsistent with federal policy, the policies of other states, the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles and medical consensus. TLDEF, in partnership with a coalition led by the Empire State Pride Agenda, has been pushing for this policy change for years.

“This is tremendous news for transgender people across the country who were born in New York State,” said TLDEF Executive Director Michael Silverman. “A birth certificate is a fundamental form of identification. This will ensure that transgender people can obtain accurate birth certificates that reflect who they are. It also means they will stop being subjected to harassment and discrimination in areas like employment where identification is essential to proving eligibility to work.”

Unfortunately, New York State’s policy change does not apply to those born in New York City, which issues its own birth certificates. TLDEF has a lawsuit pending against the City of New York and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, challenging the city's onerous practice of requiring transgender people to undergo surgery before it will issue them birth certificates with corrected sex designations.

“It is time for New York City to follow the lead of New York State by adopting policies that treat transgender New Yorkers fairly and equally,” Silverman said. “Transgender people in New York City cannot be denied the right to update their birth certificates to reflect who they truly are simply because they were born within New York City rather than elsewhere in the state. That is unfair, and we will continue to prosecute our lawsuit demanding change until all transgender people in New York State – including those in New York City – are treated fairly.”

The Federal Government and the States of California, Iowa, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington, as well as the District of Columbia, have updated their birth certificate policies to recognize that an individual’s sex does not depend on surgical status. Last year the American Medical Association passed a resolution in support of policies “that allow for a change of sex designation on birth certificates for transgender individuals based upon verification by a physician that the individual has undergone transition according to applicable medical standards of care.” The World Professional Association for Transgender Health has also long supported this approach.

May 29, 2014

SafeSpace contributes data to national report on hate violence released today

Call SafeSpace, 863-0003, if you or someone you know is experiencing hate violence, intimate partner violence, domestic violence, sexual violence or discrimination.  Advocates are availble to provide emotional support, advocacy, information and referrals.  SafeSpace also has a report violence online annonymously option, It Matters, Make it Count.

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May 29, 2014 | For Immediate Release

National Report on Hate Violence Against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Communities Released Today

Multi-Year trends in anti-LGBTQ hate violence and homicides continue

To download the full report please visit NCAVP online

  • Rates of anti-LGBTQ violence remain consistent in 2013 with 2,001 total incidents reported, with a substantial increase in the severity of violence reported
  • Transgender women, people of color, and gay men face the highest risk of homicide
  • Transgender women, undocumented people, transgender people, people of color, and gay men face the most severe violence 
  • Fewer survivors are reporting hate violence to the police, and those reporting are being met with increased police hostility

NATIONAL—Today the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) released its annual report documenting the high level of hate violence experienced by LGBTQ and HIV-affected persons in the United States in 2013.  The report, Hate Violence Against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Communities in the United States in 2013, is the most comprehensive report on this violence in the United States.  It draws on data collected from 14 anti-violence programs in 13 states across the country and Puerto Rico.  States reporting were: Ohio, Illinois, Colorado, California, Michigan, Massachusetts, New York, Vermont, Kansas, Missouri, Texas, Minnesota, and Arizona. 

General Findings

NCAVP’s 2013 hate violence report documents 2,001 incidents of anti-LGBTQ violence in 2013, a slight decrease from the 2,016 total incidents reported in 2012. However, for NCAVP member organizations that reported data in both 2012 and 2013, the number of incidents increased.  NCAVP member organization, Sean’s Last Wish, reported data in 2012 but not 2013, while the Civil Rights Commission of Puerto Rico reported for the first time in 2013.  The total number of incidents, disregarding data from Sean’s Last Wish in 2012 and the Civil Rights Commission of Puerto Rico in 2013, increased by 3%, from 1,926 incidents in 2012 to 1,984 incidents in 2013.  Reports of violence also increased in severity in 2013, with a 21% increase in reports of physical hate violence.  The 2013 report continues to document multi-year trends revealing that anti-LGBTQ and HIV-affected hate violence disproportionately impacts transgender women, LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities of color, transgender people, and transgender people of color.  Consistent with previous years, gay men represented the largest group of hate violence survivors and victims in 2013, showing that hate violence remains a pervasive and persistent issue for all LGBTQ and HIV-affected people.  

 

Continue reading "SafeSpace contributes data to national report on hate violence released today " »

May 27, 2014

June's Courageous Conversations at St. Johnsbury's Catamount Arts Academy: "Challenges and Celebrations of being LGBTQ in the NEK"

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RU12?'s Northeast Kingdom LGBTQA Community Advisory Group is hosting June's Courageous Conversations Through Art, "Challenges and Celebrations of being LGBTQ in the NEK" at the Catamount Film and Arts Center! All screenings begin at 7pm and are free. Discussions will follow each film; all are welcome!

Schedule of films is as follows:

Monday, June 2 - Imagine Me & You
Monday, June 9 - Cloudburst the Movie (2010)
Monday, June 16 - Weekend
Monday, June 23 - Transamerica
Monday, June 30 - Valentine Road

The Courageous Conversations panel conversation, also free and open to the public, will be moderated by RU12?'s very own Jean Sienkewicz, who coordinates RU12's SafeSpace and LGBT Elders programs, and will take place at 6pm on Thursday, June 12 in the Catamount's Cabaret Room. 

Please join us for some films, some stories, and some dialogue about being LGBTQ in the NEK. 

For more information, contact Jean at RU12?, 802.860.7812, jean@ru12.org or Jerri Ryan at Northeast Vermont Area Agency on Aging, 802.751.0431, jryan@nevaaa.org.

LGBTQA in the NEK - Courageous Conversation - Revised -.Two

May 12, 2014

6 Degrees Program

what is 6 degrees?

It can be hard getting through the door to get an HIV test. There are many reasons why people will put off getting tested. But when someone they know reaches out and supports them in getting tested, taking this important step becomes easier to do. Often people have thought about getting tested and just need a little outside encouragement and support to move forward. That’s where the 6 Degrees project comes in.

6 Degrees is a project where Vermonters who are connected to friends, peers and acquaintances at risk of becoming HIV positive (like having unprotected sex or sharing needles) volunteer to become Community Advocates who reach out to their circles and encourage folks to get tested. This non-judgemental peer support, and the support from a network of testers, makes it easier for people to come in for testing and find out what their HIV status is.

 

why is it important to get tested for hiv?

HIV can have a major impact on someone’s health. Many people will not have any symptoms (like getting ill more often) for 11 years after they’ve become HIV-positive, and 1 in 5 people who are living with HIV don’t realize it. The sooner someone gets tested and knows their HIV status, the sooner they can take steps to keep themselves and their partners healthier for longer. 

Six degs people no screen
 

what do i get out of it?

Itunes-gift-card-100-usIf you become a Community Advocate, you will receive gift cards, credit towards your bills, and other incentives of your choice worth $25 for each person at risk of becoming HIV-positive that you refer who comes in for a Smalltest. For example, you could earn up to $250 towards an iPad or an electric bill. You will also be a part of a new, exciting project that breaks down barriers for our friends and community, helping those we know and care about to stay healthier and informed. 

 

who runs the 6 degrees project?

The RU12? Community Center, an organization that celebrates, educates and advocates with and for LGBTQ Vermonters has partnered with the Comprehensive Care Clinics, a system of four clinics providing state-of-the-art treatment for all stages of HIV/AIDS. These two organizations work together to:

  • Recruit Community Advocates
  • Support the advocates in connecting with their communities
  • Provide anonymous HIV testing to the people in the Community Advocates' social circles

 

how do i get involved?

If you’re interested in becoming a Community Advocate, contact Mike Bensel or John Chagnon at the RU12? Community Center by calling (802) 860-7812 or emailing 6degrees@ru12.org. You can also contact Deborah Kutzko or Zpora Perry and at the Comprehensive Care Clinic by calling (802) 847-4594. We will set up an interview with you where you can learn more about the program and make sure it’s a good fit for you.

 

  • RU12? Community Center
  • 255 So. Champlain St. #12
  • Burlington, VT 05401
  • [P] 802-860-RU12 (7812)
  • 6Degrees@ru12.org
  • www.RU12.org
  • Comprehensive Care Clinic
  • Fletcher Allen’s Medical Center
  • East Pavilion , Level 5
  • 111 Colchester Avenue
  • Burlington, VT 05401
  • [P] 802-847-4594
  • Toll Free: 1-800-358-1144 ext. 4594

May 06, 2014

SafeSpace Elders Program on Across the Fence

 

Episode closed captioning (text) available upon request. Please email your request to:atfence@uvm.edu or call us at: (802) 656-5059. 

http://www.uvm.edu/extension/atfence/?m=201405 

 

April 07, 2014

VT Law School: Life after US v. Windsor

Vls
Thursday April 10 at 5:30pm, A Post-Argument Discussion: Life after US v. Windsor
Almost a year after Justice Kennedy declared the federal definition of marriage under DOMA unconstitutional, the panel will discuss some of the immediate and long-term impacts of the decision on federal law and the 1,138 federal benefits available to citizens. The panel will discuss the second prong of DOMA, which provides that the individual states do not have to recognize and give full faith and credit to marriages of other states, thus allowing states that have statutory or constitutional bans on same-sex marriage to refuse to recognize such marriages from other states. 

Vermont Supreme Court Justice Beth Robinson will be the keynote speaker, and the panelists include VLS Professor Cheryl Hanna, State Representative Bill Lippert, and ADF Spokeswoman Kellie Fiedorek. Vermont CLE credit is available for this session.

 More Info

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month

SafeSpace, a member program of The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP), stands in solidarity with survivors and victims of sexual assault in commemorating the 14th annual National Sexual Assault Awareness Month.  During this month, NCAVP raises awareness about this form of violence within and against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and HIV-affected (LGBTQ and HIV-affected) communities and calls for an end to sexual assault.

Sexual assault is an act of violence in which someone conducts sexual activity without another person’s consent.  Sexual assault offenders exert power and control over survivors through coercion, manipulation, shame, pressure, violating boundaries, and other tactics.  Sexual assault can overlap with other forms of violence and can be committed by strangers, acquaintances, friends, family members, and intimate partners.  In NCAVP’s 2013 report Intimate Partner Violence in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV Communities, NCAVP members reported that almost 10% of LGBTQ and HIV-affected  survivors of intimate partner violence experienced form of sexual abuse or harassment from a partner in 2012.  Additionally, NCAVP members reported that 3.1% of hate violence reports were sexual violence in the report Hate Violence Against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV-Affected Communities in the United States in 2012.  The Centers for Disease Control’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey found lifetime prevalence rates of sexual violence for LGB individuals were similar or higher than non-LGB people, while other research has found very high prevalence rates of sexual violence against transgender people.

Discrimination against LGBTQ and HIV-affected people contributes to LGBTQ and HIV-affected sexual violence survivors feeling pressure to not out other LGBTQ and HIV-affected people as having committed sexual violence.  LGBTQ and HIV-affected survivors of sexual assault may experience increased barriers to reporting sexual violence such as fear due to threats from an abusive partner to out the survivor’s sexual orientation, gender identity, or HIV-status.  Additionally, LGBTQ and HIV-affected survivors may experience disbelief, indifferent, biased attitudes from law enforcement and service providers, and a lack of culturally appropriate and sensitive resources.

In recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, NCAVP commits to continue to support LGBTQ and HIV-affected survivors of sexual assault by advocating for political strategies to address and end this violence, documenting its impact, and assisting NCAVP member programs to support LGBTQ and HIV-affected sexual violence survivors.  NCAVP calls on community members, anti-violence organizations, and public officials to take action in recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month to end sexual assault in our communities.

Continue reading "April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month" »

March 27, 2014

RU12? Community Center Annual LGBTQA Celebration: The Big Reveal

 

RU12? Community Center Annual LGBTQA Celebration: The Big Reveal

 

Excitement has been building steadily around this event over the last six months. With our roots planted firmly in our past, RU12? is extending our community-centered work across Vermont and scaling up the Center happenings.  From our move back to Burlington last summer and showing the works of local LGBTQ artists at the Art Hop to co-hosting the Pride Dance, we are presenting more and more opportunities for our community and allies to get out into the world and celebrate. The momentum continues building and in the coming months, we will produce Pride Vermont, feature such notable artists as John Killaky in the Center space, present one of our popular Town Hall Series on growing our LGBTQ families, and offer a host of new and exciting social and educational opportunities.

 

All of these amazing new events and programs will happen under a new Center name!! Join us and be the first to hear it as we do our tantalizing Big Reveal.

 

Of course, what would all the newness be without a shift in our biggest event of the year? Join us at Echo for an evening featuring tasting stations with the most amazing dishes designed to impress, by three of Vermont’s leading caterers.

big reveal 

May 2, 2014

Echo Lake Aquarium in Burlington, Vermont

Get Tickets

 

Cocktail reception at 6:00PM

Tasting Stations open at 7:00PM

Silent and Live Auctions

 

Catering by

Sugarsnap

Leunig’s Bistro and Lounge

Catering by Dale

 

The Vermont Pride Awards

Each year, RU12? honors Vermont community members and businesses who go above and beyond to ensure that our LGBTQ community thrives in a dynamic, safe, and exciting environment.

 

The Vermont Pride Award for Activism

Peep Show

The Vermont Pride Activism Award is being presented to the Peep Show. Peep Show is a sassy, irreverent drag and burlesque show, celebrating camp in all things. Producers Jonathan Bitchman and Quechee George create a queer-friendly, sex-positive, and above all, inclusive performance space/environment. Their community driven philanthropic effort showcases new and seasoned talent from Burlington to Boston to NYC. Throughout the show, Jonathan and Quechee let the audience know about everything from where to find support for survivors or violence to where to find an HIV test. At the end of the evening, they pay their performers and the rest is donated to support RU12?.  http://peepshowvermont.tumblr.com

 

The Vermont Pride Community Award for Community Service

The Northeast Kingdom LGBTQA Advisory Committee

The Northeast Kingdom LGBTQA Advisory Committee provides cultural education and awareness on behalf of LGBTQ-identified individuals, with special emphasis on aging adults, living in the rural Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. The Committee hosts social and educational events and provides education and technical assistance that is LGBTQ affirming, to staff of programs, agencies and organizations that provide services to aging adults.

 

The Vermont Pride Award for Business of the Year

National Life Group

National Life Group, a company with strong Vermont roots. They are very much a part of our communities, supporting such organizations as Pride VT, VT CARES, Outright VT, and the Gay and Lesbian Fund of VT. Their Human Resources Center has the very Vermont title, “The People Center” and their benefits are fully supportive of LGBTQ individuals and families. With “Do Good, Be Good, Make Good.” as a set of corporate values, it is no wonder that they are such a strong supporter of Vermont’s LGBTQ communities.

 

National Life Group is a diversified family of financial service companies that has successfully forged a strong identity as a product innovator offering personalized service. Companies in the group offer a comprehensive portfolio of life insurance, annuity and investment products to help individuals, families and businesses pursue their financial goals.

https://www.nationallifegroup.com/PublicSite/Views/AboutUs.aspx?id=105

 

The Live and Silent Auctions

This year, our auctions are bigger than ever, with items for every budget and interest. Businesses and individuals from across Vermont and all the way to Beijing have donated to the auctions. You will be able to bid on everything from an in-home dinner for eight prepared by Leunig’s Donnell Collins and her amazing staff; summer passes to St. Michael’s Playhouse; and hand blown glass vases to tattoo time and yoga passes. Proceeds support the Center’s social gatherings, educational events, and direct services for the LGBT community.

 

Thank you to our generous sponsors:

sugarsnapLeunigscaterbydalefarrell

TDBank: Fundraising for RU12!

Looking to open an account at a good bank? Or are you a current account holder at TD Bank?

Td bank logo

 

TD Bank is continuing their support of the local LGBTQ community by raising money for RU12? Community Center. When you open a new, non-interest bearing checking account and use the code "A2226" you could earn $25 from TD Bank for yourself, and they will donate $50 to RU12? Community Center! 

What can a $50 donation do for RU12? Community Center? 

  • provide HIV testing
  • provide an hour of SafeSpace services
  • train a social services agency on working with the LGBTQ community
  • reach thousands of LGBTQ Vermonters with targeted information on social media
  • keep the library open for a day

If you get a couple friends to join you, you will all

  • Keep the Center's doors open for a full day
  • Help RU12? to do elders work in the Northeast Kingdom
  • Produce one Family Program event
  • Support two months of the What's Up e-newsletter
  • Sustain the Disabilities Support Network for one month

Current account holders can add the code of "A2226" to their checking account to earn a $10 donation toward RU12? Community Center. Every dollar counts!

Visit William Cross at the Winooski TD Bank branch, or give him a call at (802) 655-3110 for more details on this fundraiser, and to get started today.

Thanks for your support! 

March 11, 2014

A Portrait of Decorum

Guest Blogger 2

A Portrait of Decorum

Decorum is sort of an old-fashioned word; you rarely hear it used in casual conversation nowadays. It's not hard to imagine why such a word that encompasses all the niceties of polite social behavior has fallen so far out of our collective national lexicon. We live in a world of ever-increasing instant gratification. We no longer communicate with friends or loved ones with long hand-written letters diligently delivered by the Post Office person we know by name. Today we rely on technology—we text, Instagram, Tweet, Snapchat, Facetime or Facebook our lives. But is this truly progress? What in reality is the social cost to the virtual worlds we create for ourselves? One thing most likely missing from the barrage of daily spam you receive is a petition for propriety, prudence, decency, modesty, or etiquette. In short, a call for the return of decorum. 

I've had the luxury to ponder this issue and do some serious self-reflection on my own personal issues and moral hesitations when confronted with doing the "right thing" vs. that which is "convenient." And to be completely honest, I found myself lacking. What prompted this introspective trek of mine? On a very snowy February 13, 2014, in the tiny but beautiful rural hamlet of St. Johnsbury, Vermont, I had the distinct honor of interviewing Ms. Charlene Willey. Ms. Willey is a true lady in the finest sense of that expression. And it was my encounter with Ms. Willey that both reaffirmed my faith in humanity's best attributes, as well as left me questioning the moral obligations my community has to its brothers and sisters who are not fortunate enough to live in an urban environment. 

Continue reading "A Portrait of Decorum " »

March 03, 2014

RU12?'s SafeSpace Trains Vermont Police

One of the most awesome things about being a RU12? Volunteer is the opportunity to do extraordinary things. Last week (work week Feb. 24 – 28, 2014), I was honored to shadow RU12? Staff member and state-wide “let’s teach’em ‘bout them queers” trainer Jean Sienkewicz from the SafeSpace program as she presented to members Vermont’s police and sheriff’s departments from all around the Green Mountain State.  A collaboration with T. J. Anderson, Training Coordinator for the Vermont State Police Academy, the curriculum was designed to “train the trainer” and participants will be taking back the knowledge gained to the various/far-reaching agencies they represent and passing along all the wisdom gained to their fellow officers.

I think the thing that really made this blogger’s heart sing with joy was the eager, earnest and openness with which those in attendance seemed to embrace the materials presented. If I had to sum up the overall attitude in the room in a single word it would have to be: engaged. As the officers present asked questions, participated in ongoing dialog and appeared determined to have an increased understanding of the LBGTQHA community they protect and serve. 

June 28, 2014, will mark the 45th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots.  Riots that marked starting line for the modern LBGTQ movement in America.  Those riots were a direct response to New York City Police discrimination, harassment and violence toward our community.  In my lifetime, as I am 45, I can say without a doubt; things most definitely have gotten better.  And with all the fine work that RU12? Is doing and continues to do on our communities’ behalf my heart is only filled with excitement and hope.

Living with HIV Social Support Group

HIV Support Group lo

February 19, 2014

Ash Beckham at Saint Michael's College -6pm, Mon 2/24

Ash-Beckham6pm, Monday  Febuary 24th 

Roy Event Center, 3rd Floor Dion Student Center

With an arresting blend of urgency and humor, Ash takes on topics like the crippling experience of being trapped in a closet, the difference between tolerance and acceptance, and the need to remove "gay" asa derogatory from our vocabulary. With wildly funny and poignant stories, and a tough yet deeply compassionate stance, Ash tells us how to take off the armor and be our authentic selves. She tells us how to GET REAL.


Many of you may know Ash from her TED Talk:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSR4xuU07sc

...so join us, and absorb her wisdom in person!

This YOU COUNT event in hosted by Common Ground

Facebook Event

Living With HIV: Social Support Group

Are you, or a friend, HIV+ and just looking for a supportive group to discuss life with HIV with other POZ individuals?

A new Burlington-area social support group will be starting on March 6th. For more information, feel free to shoot a confidential email or call: 

John
john@ru12.org
(802) 860-7812

Jo
tsnjo@sover.net
1(888) 338-8796

HIV Support Group lo

February 11, 2014

RU12? in the news


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Photo: Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images  

http://www.necn.com/02/10/14/Gay-NFL-prospect-draws-praise-from-Vt-ad/landing_sports.html?blockID=862700 

Check it out NECN.com

January 18, 2014

Just a few moments for LGBTQ Vermonters...


SamaraHey All-

The Samara Fund, part of the Vermont Community Foundation, has been a huge supporter of RU12? Community Center. We have been able to do everything from truly committing to a statewide expansion to strengthening the safety nets for LGBT seniors in the NEK because the Samara Fund has been there supporting LGBTQ issues. Now, you can help them out by taking this survey. They are seeking your opinion on needs and services that are important to you and the broader LGBTQ community in Vermont. 

As our thank you for participating, at the end of the survey you will be able to vote for your favorite Vermont-based LGBTQ organization to receive a mini-grant of $250.  The organization with the most votes at the end of the survey period will receive this gift of appreciation. You can also use this link to share the survey on your Facebook page:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZCFBRXH

Thanks all!! 

Kim Fountain, Executive Director

 

December 17, 2013

Internship Opportunities: Spring 2014

Internship opportunities

RU12? has six internship opportunies available for students in Chittenden County:

  • The GLAM Interns will assist in the coordination of RU12?'s fun, social HIV prevention

    program, GLAM. Two openings exist for this internship.
  • The Marketing and Outreach Interns will participate in various stages of print and online marketing and outreach projects. Four opportunities are available. 

All internships will be able to provide opportunities for skill development, gaining experience in their respective fields, and fulfilling internship or college credit requirements. Interns receive training, tailored assignments based on interests and skills, and supportive supervision from our staff. See below for details!

 

GLAM Intern:

Description

RU12? Community Center is looking for two interns to help plan events for gay, bi, and trans guys who like gay, bi, and trans guys for GLAM, RU12?’s Mpowerment program. GLAM is a group of young gay, bi, queer and/or trans guys who are coming together, getting out, and enjoying the connections we make. Through building a stronger queer community in Chittenden County, we empower one another, support each other, and fight the HIV epidemic. Glam pride

This fun and meaningful project is run by and for GBQT guys. Interns of all identities are encouraged to apply.

This intern should be prepared to work in a deadline oriented team environment, and will finish the internship having gained broad experience in various aspects of event planning, marketing and community organizing.

Responsibilities

  • Attend weekly core group meetings every Wednesday at 6:30pm
  • Assist in the planning and implementation of weekly social events for GBQ folks on the masculine spectrum.
  • Assist in the distribution or delivery of marketing materials via social media networks, through the organizations website and through direct contact with collaborating agencies and members of the LGBTQ community.
  • Help recruit core volunteers and program participants at LGBTQ events in the area.

Requirements

RU12?  is looking for an undergraduate student in the Chittenden County area who is majoring in Art/Design, Gender Studies, Human Service / Non-Profit Mgmt, Journalism, Social Work, Community Development, Marketing Public Relations or any other related field.  This person should have excellent verbal and written communication skills, especially with web and social media. This internship would require a minimum of 4 hours per week.

If you are interested in this position please email michael@ru12.org

 

Marketing and Outreach Intern:

Description

RU12? Community Center is looking for a tech savvy intern with an eye for design to join our fabulous team. Our organization provides services that celebrate and support LGBTQ Vermonters, and seeks an intern who can participate in various stages of print and online marketing campaigns.

This intern should be prepared to work in a deadline oriented team environment, and will finish the internship having gained broad experience in various aspects of marketing and community organizing.

Experience in HTML or design is helpful but not necessary. We’re willing to train the right candidate.

Responsibilities 

  • Assist in the creation of e-mail & print campaigns, weekly e-newsletters and blog postings
  • Assist in the distribution or delivery of marketing materials via social media networks, through the organizations website and through direct contact with collaborating agencies.
  • Perform analysis of communications and outreach data.

Requirements

RU12?  is looking for an undergraduate student in the Chittenden County area who is majoring in Art/Design, Gender Studies, Human Service / Non-Profit Mgmt, Journalism, Social Work, Community Development, Marketing Public Relations or any other related field.  This person should have excellent verbal and written communication skills, with web and social media. Experience with design programs, PowerPoint, Word and Excel experience is a bonus. This internship would require a minimum of 4 hours per week.

If you are interested in this position please email michael@ru12.org

December 04, 2013

Film Screening: God Loves Uganda

God-Loves-Uganda

 

Free Screening of the critically acclaimed documentary, "God Loves Uganda" Hosted by VT/NH Chapter of Americans United for the Separation of Church & State

Co-Sponsors: RU12? and Peace & Justice Center

Date: Friday Dec. 6

Time: 6:30

Location: RU12? Community Center, 255 South Champlain St. Suite 12, Burlington, VT 05401

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/591610780898210/?context=create

More info about the film: http://www.godlovesuganda.com/

The feature-length documentary God Loves Uganda is a powerful exploration of the evangelical campaign to change African culture with values imported from America's Christian Right.

The film follows American and Ugandan religious leaders fighting "sexual immorality" and missionaries trying to convince Ugandans to follow Biblical law. God Loves Ugandapremiered at the Sundance Film Festival on January 18th, 2013 and has won numerous awards at film festivals so far. The film serves as a catalyst for change, through our upcoming international screening tour and social action campaign.

December 01, 2013

World AIDS Day

World AIDS Day is held on 1 December each year and is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, show their support for people living with HIV and to commemorate people who have died. World AIDS Day was the first ever global health day and the first one was held in 1988.

Did you know it's possible to live a full, healthy life with HIV and potentially never develop AIDS if you are diagnosed and follow a treatment plan as soon as possible? Did you know that 60% of those aged 13-24 living with HIV don't even know it and can unknowingly pass it on to others? 

The first step in the battle against AIDS is knowing your status. RU12? offers free, anonymous testing Tuesdays and Thursdays 12-6pm and by appointment or house call. Call 802-860-7812 or email glam@ru12.org for more information. 

World aids day

November 25, 2013

Spotlight: Being a Gay Comedian in Vermont

Did you know there is a vibrant underground stand-up comedy scene in Vermont? And did you know there's even a stand-up comedy scene in the LGBT community? 

RU12? and VT Cares volunteer Marc Bouchard knows all about it. He was one of six hilarious LGBT comics lined up at Vermont Comedy Club's LGBTQ focused event this past weekend, The Fabulous Show.  Below is a personal account from him on being a gay comedian in Vermont: 

  Throughout my life, I've had people around me say things like "You should perform on stage" or you're funny, you should be a comedian".  I would say "Thanks" and think they were just being nice, and that it would be too time consuming to get involved in performance arts. 

Marc B

    In October 2011, a small comedy club in Burlington opened, and I attended their first comedy showcase.  It was mentioned  that they were hosting a weekly open mic where anyone could have five minutes of stage time.  I went home and went to work on jokes, and performed the following week.  I was immediately addicted, and performed weekly at the open mic, attaining the nickname "Gay Marc" because my material was based around my life, and coming out in a rural and conservative part of Vermont.

    As I started performing in showcases, I quickly realized that the majority of the audiences were heterosexual and could not relate to some of my material.  Anytime I have a joke that doesn't get a response, I see this as an opportunity to rewrite and educate my audience on the gay lifestyle.

    It's not about being political, or shoving my lifestyle down anyone's throat (I have something else for that).  All I want to do is make people laugh.  By laughing at myself, and relating my lifestyle to theirs, I feel like I bridge a gap to my straight audience.  I hope to help them see that we have similar issues, and that laughter truly is the best medicine. 

You can preview part of his set from The Fabulous Show here: "Pray the Gay Away" 

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